The real story of how the ‘Cold Room’ worked in NFL history

The NFL was in a state of turmoil from 1970 to 1973, and it was also in the midst of a national scandal about its cold rooms.

In 1970, after a New York Times reporter found that the league’s cold rooms had been used for dirty laundry in the previous year, commissioner Joe Robbie issued a memo saying that the practice had to stop.

But that didn’t stop the league from doing it again the following year, this time in Miami.

In fact, it went on to use the facility again in the AFC Championship Game, and the NFL was able to get a record-setting record-tying 38-19 victory over the Patriots.

The cold rooms, as they were known at the time, were used to clean out the locker rooms and the practice fields of players who had fallen ill, but the practice itself was considered nothing more than a way to get the league to produce its players better.

According to former NFL executive Bill Polian, the practice was so common, and so dangerous, that it had to be banned at some point in its history.

It was the ultimate in dehumanization, Polian told CBS Sports’ Scott Simon.

“If you went into a locker room and it wasn’t clean, you wouldn’t be able to put your hand up there to shake hands,” Polian said.

“The players got sick, and they were told to get better. “

That’s when we went to a different way of doing things.” “

The players got sick, and they were told to get better.

That’s when we went to a different way of doing things.”

As Polian put it, it was a way of life that was not at all about the welfare of the players.

“It was about profit.

It’s a very simple business.

And the players would come in, and there were always somebody to get their paycheck,” Polia said.

It is no surprise that a former commissioner would be upset about the practice.

“I don’t know what the problem was,” Commissioner Roger Goodell told Simon, “but the people were paid.”

This story is the second of two parts.

The first part will be published on Friday.